A Woman Who Makes a Difference

» Posted on Mar 3, 2012 in Blog | 5 comments

I asked a reader who works with victims of human trafficking to tell us about what she does. I wrote Saving Hope to showcase a world problem that needs help in stopping. I really appreciate Kim Wong sharing her story.
 
 
Background Info: Kim Wong is a 27-year-old Chinese-American. She currently lives in Kolkata, India, but she grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area in California. She received her B.S. in Biological Sciences from the University of California, Davis and wants to continue on to medical school in the near future.
 
What do you do to stop human trafficking?
I volunteer for a social welfare organization in India that rescues women and young girls from sex slavery. I spend most of my time at a girls’ home that has 19 girls ages 6-17. Most if not all of the girls were abused – their mothers were or currently are trapped in sex slavery. I tutor the girls in English and Math and eventually will help with music and computer skills. By giving these girls the love and education they need, they will hopefully not continue the cycle of hopelessness that sex slavery causes.
 
Why did you choose to do what you are doing?
God called me to do something personally for the young girls being trafficked in January 2011. I was planning on applying to medical school. My MCAT scores were going to expire soon. I did not think I could go. But God told me that if I would give Him a year of my life, He would take care of the rest. How could I say “NO” to that? I said “YES” and do not regret it one bit. I will still be applying to medical school in a few months.
 
What problems do you see?
Young women are kidnapped, trapped, and sold into sex slavery and usually moved to another city or country. The women have children that grow up in brothels. These children grow up surrounded by drugs, violence, and sexual abuse and some of these children are sold to another brothel when they reach the age of 10. The cycle of hopelessness continues. The spread of disease and AIDS seems endless. These women are usually from small, peaceful villages – the women cannot go back home because of the shame.
 
What hope do you see?
Every time I look into the eyes of the girls at the home, I see hope. I see love. I see trust. I see a life that God has transformed. I see something so special that has the ability to make me laugh and cry. I see families reunited. I see peace. When I look into the eyes of the women from the vocational unit, I see women on a journey to restoration, to wholeness. I see women who cling to hope for a better life for their families.
 
What organization do you work for and what do they do?
I work for a Project Rescue affiliate site in Kolkata, India. The organization provides a vocational center for women who choose to leave their brothels and learn a trade. The vocational center makes sari quilts, bags, paper products, and jewelry. They have a girls’ home for the children of prostituted women (mothers sign over guardianship). They also provide an evening care center near the Red Light District for the children to have a safe place to stay Monday through Friday from 5 – 8 pm. They also have Sunday school in the afternoon. For more information, please refer to www.projectrescue.com. If you have any specific questions for me, please feel free to email me at kimberlyiswong@gmail.com.
 

5 Comments

  1. Margaret, I didn’t realize this topic was close to your heart! My second novel deals (more peripherally than I had hoped) with child slavery. I search for fair trade as often as possible and try to make the world aware. Thank you for spotlighting a woman working in the field.

    I assume you’ve read Kathi Macia’s book Deliver Me From Evil?

  2. The local news has let viewers know human trafficking is prevalent in Nebraska. Who would have thought? Then again, we just have to consider all the drugs that go through on the interstate that intersects the country.
    No matter what, God is still on His throne and individuals are healed.
    Thanks for this timely subject.

  3. Carol, I’ve read Kathi’s new book (the sequel) called Special Delivery. I endorsed it. It’s great.

    LoRee, my part of the country has a lot of problems, too.

  4. This is quite a topic and one that more people should know more about. We have been hearing so much about it and it is so heart breaking.

    Blessings,
    Jo

  5. What an amazing post. I always feel like there is more we can all do.

    marypres(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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